Christian and jehovah witness dating

JWs believe the Bible is “God’s inspired message to humans.” In 1961 a JW corporation, The Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society, published its own formal equivalence translation of the Bible: the New World Translation of the Holy Scriptures (NWT).

As of 2015, the NWT has been translated in whole or in part into 129 languages.

Roughly two-thirds (65 percent) are women, while only 35 percent are men.

They also also tend to be less educated, with a solid majority of adult Jehovah’s Witnesses (63 percent) having no more than a high school diploma (compared with, for example, 43 percent of evangelical Protestants). Jehovah’s Witnesses (hereafter JWs) consider themselves to be Christians (but not Protestants), even though they reject the doctrine of the Trinity.

JWs do not refer to their places of worship as churches, but rather as a “Kingdom Hall.” They have no paid clergy, for they believe the “model of first-century Christianity” is one in which “all baptized members are ordained ministers and share in the preaching and teaching work.” Both men and women can be ministers, though within each congregation “spiritually mature men” serve as “older men,” or elders.” About 20 congregations form a circuit, and congregations receive periodic visits from traveling elders known as circuit overseers.

JWs are not required to tithe and no collections are taken at their meetings, though donation boxes are available. Doctrinal guidance is provided by a Governing Body made up of longtime JWs who currently work at the international offices in Brooklyn, New York.

Since the release of the NT translation in 1950, this version has been criticized for changing the meaning and words of the text to fit JW doctrine. Both the ESV and NIV translate that verse as, “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” The NWT version translates the passage as “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was a god.” The addition of the indefinite article “a” is added to avoid the conclusion that Jesus is God. Metzger wrote in 1953, “It must be stated quite frankly that, if the Jehovah’s Witnesses take this translation seriously, they are polytheists.” Despite a preference for the NWT, JWs still use other translations of the Bible in their witnessing work. JWs do not celebrate either Christmas or Easter, because they believe the Bible teaches that it’s Jesus death—not his birth or resurrection—that should be celebrated.

And if Christ has not been raised, our preaching is useless and so is your faith.Hi Tshepo, That is a big question and I can’t go into all the details here.However let me point out a couple of fairly big issues that distinguish the two.The thing to note is that these are central issues of the Christian faith and if you do not believe them then you cannot be called a Christian.If any one of these is wrong then all of Christianity is wrong and is not worth following.

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